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Creative Clusters 2005, Belfast: Programme

Creative Clusters 2005
Europa Hotel, Belfast
Monday 24th – Wednesday 26th October 2005

Programme Highlights

  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: How is China developing it’s creative and cultural industries?
  • Hot Property: What can cultural entrepreneurs do to protect their ideas?
  • Heralding A New Era in the UK: Will Creative and Cultural Skills succeed?
  • Creative Capital: How are the creative industries transforming the Belfast economy?
  • Ghettoizing Creativity?: What’s the future for a Black Creative Class?
  • Up on the Hill: In the world’s largest economy how do you pursuade the US power elite their way is not the only way?
  • Storm in a Coffee Cup: How is tax law, a coffee producer and a shoe maker helping to boost Italian creativity?
  • Latecomer with Potential: What’s the future for Germany’s creative sector?
  • Dreaming of Electronic Sheep: How can creative industries help revitalise a declining rural economy?
  • Glasgow – Still ‘Miles Better’?: 15 years after the 1990 European City of Culture
  • Knowing when to Stop: What does the creative sector do next when public millions are wasted?
  • Time to stop playing around, and start playing around: Is it time for a UK computer games ‘institute’?
  • Revolution in the Head: Could the UK lead a cultural strategy for Europe?

Policy Issues

Investing in Creativity: will examine what http://www.gooakley.com/ finance is available and ask how different types of finance affect the creative, social and business outcomes of creative enterprise. Is lack of finance inhibiting creative growth?

Delivering Skills for Creativity: invites educators, policy-makers, creative entrepreneurs and producers to explore a challenge faced by the whole economy. How can we meet the increasing demand for creative skills and abilities?

Inclusion Through Creativity: asks fundamental questions about equality, diversity and inclusion, media ownership and the positive (and negative) outcomes of a rapidly expanding global creative economy. Do the creative industries offer an equitable solution?

Keynote Speakers

  • Dr Chris Yapp, Head of Public Sector Innovation at Microsoft, UK
  • Professor The Right Honourable Baroness Lola Young of Hornsey OBE
  • Howard Beale, thefishcansing ltd
  • James Purnell, MP, Minister for Creative Industries and Tourism

Partners & Sponsors

Belfast City Council, EQ, Hi8us, Creative & Cultural Skills, DCAL, InterTradeIreland, Arts Council N.I, University of Ulster / NICEC, New Start, Arts Professional, Belfast City Council Development Department, 3RD SOURCE MEDIA, UK Presidency of the EU.


Pre-Conference: Special Events (Sun 23 Oct)
Belfast City: Sightseeing Trip
10:45am – 12:00pm

How often do you attend a conference and never get the opportunity to see the city? Well this is your chance!
Sit back and enjoy this guided bus tour of Belfast and sample some of Belfasts history and unique culture, including Belfast’s very own leaning tower, the Albert Clock, the recently regenerated Laganside development, the famous Belfast shipyards and birthplace of the infamous Titanic.

Tour
Building the Titanic: Boat Trip
3:30pm – 4:45pm

The Belfast shipyards were once the cornerstone of the city’s economy. This tour will enable you to see where the Titanic’s infamous journey began.

The boat trip sets sail from the River Lagan Lookout, viewing sites the drawing offices where the Titanic was designed, the slipways where this most famous of all luxury liners first slid into the water and the specially adapted Thompson dry dock where she was outfitted. Expert commentary is provided by members of the Ulster Titanic Association.

Tour
Arts Council Northern Ireland: Drinks Reception
6:00pm – 7:00pm, Europa Hotel

The Arts Council Northern Ireland welcomes you to attend a drinks reception at the Europa Hotel after pre-conference registration.

Avoid the rush of registration on the first morning, arrive in Belfast on Sunday 23rd and enjoy the hospitality of the Arts Council Northern Ireland.

Networking
Queen’s University: Creative Technology Exhibition & Reception
7:15pm – 8:30pm, Queen’s University

The £6m Sonic Arts Research Centre at Queen’s University has brought together key researchers from music, computer science and electronic and electrical engineering into a world-class research group. The specially designed building includes the world’s first Sonic cheap oakley sunglasses Laboratory, which is best understood as an auditory equivalent of an IMAX theatre, or a ‘cinema for the ear’.

Delegates are invited to a drinks reception and guided tour of creative industries-related activity at Queen’s University.

Tour
Day 1: Workshops & Tours (Mon 24 Oct)
Barcelona: A Regional Response to Supporting the Creative Industries
9:00am – 1:00pm, Edinburgh Suite

What is the real story behind the successful transformation of Barcelona from industrial mega-port to post-modern cultural hotspot?

Three of the key players in Catalunya’s development will discuss the policy, political and practitioner contributions that have driven change.

Speakers are Jordi Pascal i Ruiz (Independent Consultant, Barcelona), Edgar Garcia (Co-ordinator of the Catalan Institute for Cultural Industries) and Octari Rofes (Director, EINA).

Workshop
W5 Visit (Mon 24th): whowhatwhenwherewhy
10:00am – 11:30am, W5

W5 is an ‘interactive discovery centre’ devoted to experiential learning, whose thought-provoking exhibits provide visitors of all ages with hands-on experiences of science, engineering and technology whilst also making links with art and design.

Dr. Sally Montgomery, Director of W5, will personally host this visit, describing W5’s educational work, their partnership with NESTA and introducing a host of brand new exhibits that have been specially designed for W5.

Tour
Building the Creative Business: Or: ‘Ten cast iron, guaranteed ways to kill a growing creative busines
11:00am – 12:30pm, Dublin 1 & 2

This workshop is based on the ‘Building the Creative Business’ course at the Centre for Creative Business, which deals in depth with the general management challenges facing founders and managers of creative businesses after the start-up. This programme provides insights, tools and a process to help navigate the unique issues faced by entrepreneurs and managers in growing creative businesses such as advertising, publishing, design, fashion, TV production, film, games software and architecture.

Workshop
Day 1: Setting the Scene (Mon 24 Oct)
Opening Plenary
1:00pm – 3:00pm, Ballroom

Chaired by Simon Evans, Creative Clusters

Plenary

Chris Yapp, Head of Public Secto, Microsoft UK, UK


Prof Baroness Lola Young, Director, Cultural Brokers, UK


Investing in Creativity: Introduction
4:00pm – 5:30pm, Ballroom 1

Chaired by Beate Becker, Independent

Investing in Creativity examines how creative industries are financed and asks how different approaches to investment affect the creative, social and business outcomes of an enterprise. How do we achieve both commercial and creative growth?

Policy Panel

West Midlands Cluster Development: Identifying investment models for the creative industries
Dave Harte, Cluster Innovation Manager, Advantage West Midlands / University of Central England, UK


Investment Readiness: What do Investors look for in a creative industry SME?
Jason Ball, Investment Executive, London Seed Capital, UK


Richard Smith-Bingham, Head of Policy and Research, NESTA, UK


Inclusion Through Creativity: Introduction
4:00pm – 5:30pm, Ballroom 2

Chaired by Geoffrey Brown, EUCLID

Inclusion Through Creativity asks fundamental questions about equality, diversity and inclusion, media ownership and the positive (and negative) outcomes of a rapidly expanding global creative economy. Are the creative industries fostering, or inhibiting, cultural diversity?

Policy Panel

Access To Creative Employment: Re-engineering curriculum development in HE/FE institutions
Jo Verrent, Programmes Director, EQ, UK


Inclusive Television: An introduction to inclusive TV
Jonnie Turpie, Executive Chairman, Maverick Television, UK


Delivering Skills for Creativity: Introduction
4:00pm – 5:30pm, Ballroom 3

Chaired by Lee Corner, LAC Limited

Delivering Skills for Creativity invites educators, policy-makers, creative entrepreneurs and producers to explore a growing challenge. How can we meet the increasing demand for creative skills and abilities? And this is not a sector-specific issue: creative industries are at the leading edge of changes affecting all businesses, and creative employees are increasingly needed across the whole economy.

Policy Panel

Beyond Talent: Defining Creativity
Chris Bilton, Lecturer, Centre for Cultural Policy Studies, University of Warwick, UK


Creativity versus practicality: Can encouraging creativity be bad for business?
Linda Florance, Chief Executive, Skillfast-UK, UK


Britain’s Creativity Challenge: Delivering a skilled creative workforce
Tom Bewick, Chief Executive, Creative & Cultural Skills, UK


Civic Opening Reception
6:30pm – 8:00pm, Belfast City Hall

Belfast City Council and Partners invite all Creative Clusters delegates to a Welcome Drinks Reception at the spectacular Belfast City Hall.

This will be an ideal opportunity to meet delegates informally before the core conference programme breaks into full flow.

Day 2: Exploring, Challenging, Learning (Tue 25 Oct)
Universities and Creative Industry: How can we improve the vocational relevance of higher education?
9:00am – 10:30am, Ballroom 1

Chaired by Lee Corner, LAC Limited

The self-taught entrepreneur, the pop-star college drop-out, the street-educated fashion guru – these much-celebrated stereotypes say much about our (the media’s?) ambivalent attitude to education institutions. But what is the truth here? How will our education and training infrastructure meet the cheap oakley challenges of the creative economy? Three practitioners at the sharp end of further education take this session into a discussion on the relationship between creativity and the classroom.

Case Study

Bridging the Digital Skills Gap: Future education and training for the media industries
Dr Keith Randle, Director, CIRCU, UK


Softening the Edges: Creative Collaborations – Nottingham Trent University and The Broadway
Frank Abbott, Programme Leader Creative Collaborations MA, Nottingham Trent School of Art & Design, UK


Music Industry Mavericks: Training tommorows entrepreneurs
Phil Ellis, Business Development Manager – The Arts, City College Manchester, UK


A Tour of Europe: Germany, Italy and the Netherlands
9:00am – 10:30am, Ballroom 2

Chaired by Geoffrey Brown, EUCLID

It is in the nature of this sector that each country will have its own take on the importance, and indeed the meaning, of the creative industries, and on the underlying relations between cultural and economic policy. This session looks at approaches to creative industry policy in Germany, Italy and the Netherlands.

Case Study

Arts as R&D in Italy: Italian creative industries investing in artistic hubs and cultural centres
Roberta Comunian, Ph.D. Student, University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK


Latecomer with Potential: On the development of a creative sector policy in Germany
Dieter Haselbach, Senior Partner, ICG Consulting Group AG – culturplan, Germany


Creative Clusters:Dutch Experiences: Comparing practice and policy in three regions
Paul Rutten, Reader, INHOLLAND University of Professional Education, Netherlands


Clusters and Classes: Practical strategies for big cities
9:00am – 10:30am, Ballroom 3

Chaired by Beate Becker, Independent

A scene-setting session that looks at planning a strategy for major metropolitan areas. How useful are the ideas of Porter, Florida and others in developing strategies for big cities? What is their practical contribution to policy-making? What are the considerations and lessons learnt for developing countries and city-regions?

Case Study

Creative Spaces: Strategies for creative cities and cultural inclusion
Graeme Evans, Director, Cities Institute, London Metropolitan University, UK


A Metropolitan Strategy for Culture: Montreal – lessons and challenges
Caroline Chapain, Research Fellow, CURS, University of Birmingham, UK


WIPO Intellectual Property Workshop: Practical intellectual property issues in developing a business plan
9:00am – 10:30am, Edinburgh Suite

Business plans are a crucial tool for approaching start-up service providers and investors and considering the market opportunities for your business. Because Intellectual Property provides your enterprise competitive advantages and increases its value, it is necessary to let start-up service providers and investors know about your Intellectual Property assets by adequately integrating them into your business plan.

Workshop

Donna Ghelfi, Program Officer, WIPO, Switzerland


Christopher Kalanje, Consultant, SMEs Div, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), Switzerland


Rural Diversification: …the only creative in the village?
9:00am – 10:30am, Rotunda Suite

Chaired by Brendan McMenamin, Derry City Council

Rural areas have everything against them – geographic isolation, poor communications, no infrastruture, declining economy – or do they? Fighting these common misconceptions, this session explores how Cumbria, the Highlands & Islands and South West UK are encouraging rural diversification, and showing how the creative class is not confined to the cities.

Case Study

Rural Creativity: A discussion of the issues facing rural creative industry development
Katie Wise, Creative Industries Development Officer, Cultural Business Venture Cumbria, UK


Wealth Creation at the Edge: Aimhi – a private sector driven best practice catalyst
Alistair Murray, Proprietor, Atlantic Marketing, UK


Arts on Farms: Creative Catalyst: 160 arts on farms projects in SW region are revitalising rural communities.
Deborah Harrison, Consultant, Silverleaf Associates, UK


Investment in Audio-Visual: Show me the money
11:00am – 12:30pm, Ballroom 1

Chaired by Beate Becker, Independent

Public sector intervention in the creative sector is fraught with difficulties. Top down or bottom up? Production, distribution or consumption? How to minimise risk and uncertainty? In this session we look at investment issues from the perspectives of the independent broker, the computer games expert and regional screen agency. How does government support entrepreneurs without interfering with entrepreneurship?

Case Study

Financing the Creative Industries: How to create competitiveness for a region through financial services
Thierry Baujard, CEO, Peacefulfish, Germany


A British Games Institute: Its time to stop playing around, and start playing around.
Toby Barnes, Founder and MD, Pixel-lab, UK


A Risky Business: Using public finance and private discipline to revolutionise regional TV
Alice Morrison, CEO, North West Vision, UK


City of Culture, City of Creativity: Capturing the long-term impact of a big splash
11:00am – 12:30pm, Ballroom 2

Chaired by Geoffrey Brown, EUCLID

These days there is hardly a city in the western world that does not consider itself creative. In this landscape, what are these designations for? Is there more than winning a title and adding ‘creativity’ to the city’s brand values? How do local creative industries and communities benefit? Can we improve global networking through such initiatives? This session examines Glasgow City of Culture 1990, Liverpool Capital of Culture 2008 and the UNESCO Creative Cities Network.

Case Study

City of Style… and Substance: Tracing the legacy of Glasgow 1990 City of Culture on local creativity
Beatriz Garcia, RCUK Academic Fellow, Centre for Cultural Policy Research, UK


Liverpool Creative Communities: Building the case for creative communities in Liverpool Capital of Culture
Alex Roy, Associate Director, DTZ Pieda Consulting, UK


UNESCO’s Creative Cities Network: A global platform for local endeavour
Arian Hassani, Consultant, UNESCO, France


Finding Creative Talent: Who’s making tomorrow’s media?
11:00am – 12:30pm, Ballroom 3

Chaired by Lee Corner, LAC Limited

Access, representation and opportunity – key issues for tomorrow’s media industry. As audience diversity increases so too does the need for fair representation – how is this achieved? How do we identify and invest in the next generation of media producers without simply recruiting in our own image? How can major media institutions connect with all levels of society? This session explores how the UK Film Council, Channel 4 and the BBC are planning for the future.

Case Study

Film Audiences, Talent and Access: Diversity in UK film industry and culture
Chris Chandler, Deputy Head of UK Partnerships, UK Film Council, UK


Plugging The Gap: The need for sustainable support for the next generation of creative talent
Adam Gee, Commissioning Editor – Interactive, Channel 4 Education, UK


Blast: A BBC creative learning campaign for teens.
Mairin Murray, Producer, BBC, UK


Learning Towards the Creative State: Exploring the links between creativity, learning and achievement
11:00am – 12:30pm, Edinburgh Suite

Creative Partnerships Merseyside has provided a living laboratory in which to explore how creatives, teachers and schools can collaborate to help young people develop their creative potential and skills for a 21st Century labour market requiring flexibility & originality. This workshop will give an insight to the challenges and resistances encountered, a practical illustration of how creatives were supported in the task and ask questions as to the long-term implications for policy and practice.

Workshop

Helen Wills, Director, Creative Partnerships Merseyside, UK


Gerri Moriarty, Community Artist and, Independent, UK


Geoff White, Sector Director for Creative Industries on Merseyside, Creative Partnerships Merseyside, UK


The Business Case for Diversity: Why should the CIs put diversity issues at the heart of what they do?
11:00am – 12:30pm, Rotunda Suite

Why should organisations within the cultural industries involve themselves with diversity issues? We all understand the moral perspectives behind the drive for equality of opportunity; this workshop looks instead at the economic perspectives. What is the business case for making diversity central to the ethos of your organisation?

Workshop

Jo Verrent, Programmes Director, EQ, UK


Policy for the Creative Locality: The devil in the detail
2:00pm – 3:30pm, Ballroom 1

Chaired by Beate Becker, Independent

Every creative cluster strategy has to start with the specifics of its own locality. It is usually local blockages that are the most persistent and and local opportunities that offer the best growth points. This session takes three contrasting locales – Salem USA, Mandaluyong Philippines and Camden UK – and examines the problems faced, the interventions made and the lessons learnt from supporting and developing their own local creative sector.

Case Study

Growing the Creative Economy in US: Challenges dealing with power elite to move creative economy forward
Patricia Zaido, Executive director, The Salem Partnership, USA


Creation of “Creative Communties”: A challenge to policy makers and advocates.
Cora Jacob, Entrepreneur, Cora Cares Foundation, Philippines


Cultural Governance for Camden: Conflict between cultural producers and cultural consumers
Galina Gornostaeva, Research Officer, LSE, UK


China: Shifting the global balance
2:00pm – 3:30pm, Ballroom 2

Chaired by Simon Evans, Creative Clusters

As well as a fifth of the world’s population and a 9% growth rate, China also has a treasury of cultural wealth and and a deep well of creative and entrepreneurial energy. What will this mean for creative industries world-wide? One of China’s leading creative industry strategists discusses the implications of China’s re-engagement with the global economy, and presents the plans for Beijing’s Chaoyang District, home to 2.75m people and venue for the 2008 Olympic Games.

Policy Panel

Study on Chaoyang District, Beijing: Planning and strategies for cultural & creative industries
Desmond Hui, Director, Centre for Cultural Policy Research, University of Hong Kong, China


Inclusive Television: Empowerment through television and digital media
2:00pm – 3:30pm, Ballroom 3

Chaired by Geoffrey Brown, EUCLID

An early promise of the digital age was that individuals and communities would have new access to media. Is this now a reality, or does the ‘digital divide’ still exist? What is the role of the major broadcasters? Will new technologies such as interactive digital TV, or the opportunity of community television make a difference? This session looks from a range perspectives at how television and digital media are empowering excluded groups.

Case Study

Missing in Action: Digital arts and cultural transformation in Sydney’s West
Lena Nahlous, Director, Information and Cultural Exchange, Australia


Kensington Vision: Empowering communities through interactive digital broadband
Simon Robertshaw, Professor/Director, ICDC at Liverpool John Moores, UK


Living Public Value: BBC Training links informal learning to corporate responsibility
Linda Cockburn, Partnership Manager, BBC Training and Development, UK


Value of the Arts: Measuring value in the creative economy
2:00pm – 3:30pm, Rotunda Suite

Chaired by Brendan McMenamin, Derry City Council

Value in the creative economy exists in many forms, so how do we measure it? Do exisiting systems work? Can indicators alone justify using the arts and creativity as an instrument of social and economic policy – or is something new needed? This session attempts to move this established debate forward, with three different perspectives from the USA, N.Ireland and the UK, each questioning the underlying principles of measuring value in the creative economy.

Case Study

Creative Vitality Measures & Policy: Case study lessons from Boston and Seattle
Joaquin Herranz, Professor of Public Affairs, University of Washington, USA


Proving Monetised Value in the Arts: A study of the application of Social Return on Investment in the Arts
Karl Leathem, Director, Lodestar, UK


Valuing Artists as Artists: Quality in the arts requires artists to be experimental
Susan Jones, Director of Programmes, a-n The Artists Information Company, UK


Design a Business: A creative act
2:00pm – 3:30pm, Edinburgh Suite

This workshop describes three models which empower creative people to understand the breadth of their skills and how to apply these in the development of a sustainable business. The models when they are combined provide: a vision for the new business; an operational plan; and an indication of the expectations for the creator of that business.

Workshop

Mark Fenwick, Head of Creative Pioneer Programme, NESTA, UK


Investment Readiness: Who is to judge and how?
4:00pm – 5:30pm, Ballroom 1

Chaired by Beate Becker, Independent

Creative industries are notoriously high-risk. Who is to tell if a film project or a record will be successful? But is it right to say that this uncertainty spreads to all kinds of creative endeavour – support services and distribution platforms for example? This session looks at ways in which entrepreneurs and investors can assess the investment-readiness of an enterprise, and asks whether creative industry funding is being wisely invested.

Case Study

The ‘Creative Advantage’ project: Providing skills for entrepreneurs to self-assess creative business ideas
David Parrish, International Management Consultant and Trainer, T-Shirts and Suits Ltd, UK


Creative Company Profiling: How benchmarks are making creative industries investment effective
Hugh Mason, Partner, Pembridge Partners LLP, UK


The Role of Artists: Animateur, peacemaker or “stormtrooper of the bourgoisie”?
4:00pm – 5:30pm, Ballroom 2

Chaired by Brendan McMenamin, Derry City Council

The creative industries have transformed the role of ‘artist as creator’ beyond recognition. The artist – the creative individual, is now asked to practice mutiple roles in multiple contexts, and as lessons learned in one field are applied in another a ‘culture of creativity’ emerges. This session explores the practical engagement of art, artists and creativity in urban planning, housing development and conflict resolution, and asks ‘what is the changing role of the artist?’

Case Study

Building Culture (An Artist’s View): The emergence of strategic integration of culture within master-planning.
David Cotterrell, Senior Lecturer in Fine Art, Sheffield Hallam University, UK


“ArtWorks” A New Investment Model: Investing to anchor creative people and institutions in urban developments
Andrew McIlroy, International Projects Manager, Futurecity, Belgium


The Case of Mountain View, Jamaica: The role of creativity in conflict resolution and community development
Sheila Graham, Director, Area Youth Foundation, Jamaica


Innovative Business Support: Who should deliver?
4:00pm – 5:30pm, Ballroom 3

Chaired by Geoffrey Brown, EUCLID

It is surprising how similar are the needs of creative businesses across the world. But what is the right structure for delivering support for creative enterprise: arms length agencies? intermediaries? sector specialists? grass-roots animateurs? This international case study session examines business support models from Vienna (Austria), Melbourne (Australia) and London (UK).

Case Study
The Viennese Way: Intelligent funding schemes to promote culture, science and economic growth
Norbert Kettner, Managing Director, departure wirtschaft, kunst und kultur gmbh, Austria


Creative Enterprise: Mind to Market: Applying business knowledge to creativity for commercial gain
Helene George, Company Director, Creative Economy Pty Ltd, Australia


Diversity business support: New enterprise support structures for BME business and individuals
Gerry Smith, Programme Director, ABi Associates, UK


Learning for Creative Industry: Workplace-based and informal learning
4:00pm – 5:30pm, Edinburgh Suite

Chaired by Lee Corner, LAC Limited

Creative employers ask for a host of skills, aptitudes and abilities that past jobs have rarely required: curiosity, imagination, confidence, interpersonal and networking skills, fashion and design-sense, emotional intelligence, entrepreneurship, flexibility and intercultural sensitivity. Can the formal education system ‘teach’ these things? This session concentrates on the role of informal settings for learning.

Case Study

Barriers to Learning: A study of work based learning in the creative and cultural industries
Laurence Solkin, Programe Director, City University, UK


Skills for Diversity: London’s Non-formal Learning Sector for the creative industries
Andrew Erskine, Senior Consultant, BOP, UK


Newtown “University” Johannesburg: Newtown Cultural Precinct Joburg as a workplace based training institution
Peter Stark, Cultural Policy Adviser, Independent, UK


Growth in the Creative Industries: NESTA research consultation
4:00pm – 5:30pm, Rotunda Suite

This workshop will present and discuss the emerging findings from a major research study currently being managed by NESTA on economic growth in the UK’s creative industries. Participants will be consulted on a data mapping exercise of sources on business growth and investment in the creative industries, and on the challenges that now exist to current thinking in policymaking circles regarding the creative industries.

Workshop

Tom Campbell, Consultant, BOP, UK


Paul Owens, Director, BOP, UK


Creative Clusters Dinner
8:00pm – 11:30pm, Ballroom

Join the Creative Clusters team and continue your networking at the conference’s main social event.

A sit-down dinner will be served in the Grand Ballroom of the Europa Hotel, join us for what promises to be a relaxed, enjoyable evening of great food and entertainment with your fellow delegates.

Day 3: Policy Directions (Wed 26 Oct)
Northern Ireland Creative Industry: Regional policy for creative industries
9:00am – 10:30am, Ballroom 1

Chaired by Brendan McMenamin, Derry City Council

What uniquely Irish dimension can be brought to creative industries development? How can the great strengths in traditional artistic activities (writing, crafts, music) be connected with the growing creative industries? Or does talk like this reek of shamrocks and blarney, and should it all be ditched in favour of a dash to mobile content and games? And at what geographic level can the sector achieve critical mass – in Belfast alone, in the North or on an all-Ireland level?

Policy Panel

Brendan McGoran, Creative Industries Officer, Belfast City Council, UK


Ian Murphy, Director, Invest Northern Ireland, UK


Tim Kelley, CBBIC Devlopment Officer, NORIBIC, UK


Heather Stevens, Director Skills and Industry Division, Department for Employment and Learning, UK


Kate Bond, Head of Cultural Development, University of Ulster, UK


Aidan Gough, Director, Strategy & Policy, InterTradeIreland, UK


Global Issues in Creativity: Diversity, empowerment and the developing world
9:00am – 10:30am, Ballroom 2

Chaired by Lee Corner, LAC Limited

This session tries to look at some of the realities of diversity and economic empowerment in the creative industries. How useful are concepts like ‘creative industries’ and ‘cultural diversity’ in the developing world? Do they mean the same thing in Lahore, Lagos and in London? Should creative industries in the advanced economies connect with the developing world through trade or support programmes? Or does it make better sense to talk instead of a trans-national black creative class?

Policy Panel

Diversity Works for London: Harnessing the benefits of diversity in the creative industries
Parminder Vir OBE, Diversity Consultant: Media, Business and Arts, London Development Agency, UK


Cultural Industries and Development: A programme for policy development
Pernille Askerud, International consultant, UNESCO, Switzerland


Empowering The Black Creative Class: The Ghetto-ization of the creative industries
Yetunde Aina, CE, Jadeas Trust, Nigeria


Building a European Consensus: Polices for culture, the knowledge economy and EC identity
9:00am – 10:30am, Ballroom 3

Chaired by Geoffrey Brown, EUCLID

Despite the fact that the UK is sceptical both about any EU foreign policy, and about cultural policy per-se, the UK’s creative industries and institutions play a key role in projecting Europe and its culture to the world. Against the backdrop of the UK Presidency of the EU, and the aspirations of the Lisbon Agenda, this session tries to connect the UK’s pragmatic ‘creative industries’ and ‘knowledge economy’ policies with the lofty aspirations of the ‘European Dream’.

Policy Panel

A Cultural Strategy for Europe: Pragmatic revolutions will require UK engagement
Gottfried Wagner, Director, European Cultural Foundation, Netherlands


Creative Renewal: What can creative industries contribute to the Lisbon Agenda?
Richard Parkes, Chair, Prevista, UK


Mark Ferrero, Head of Creative Industries, Department for Culture Media Sport, UK


Investing in Creativity: Theme Closing
11:00am – 12:00pm, Ballroom 1

Chaired by Beate Becker, Independent

Theme Closing Sessions mirror the Theme Introduction Sessions of the first day. The format is a Policy Panel led and guided by the Theme Champion and the two Theme Chairs. The Theme Chairs give a short report (20 minutes each), which is followed by discussion for the rest of the session. The aim here is to identify and clarify the key points that have emerged from the conference, including areas of consensus or conflict, critical insights, and issues, challenges and directions for policy development.

Policy Panel
Inclusion Through Creativity: Theme Closing
11:00am – 12:00pm, Ballroom 2

Chaired by Geoffrey Brown, EUCLID

Theme Closing Sessions mirror the Theme Introduction Sessions of the first day. The format is a Policy Panel led and guided by the Theme Champion and the two Theme Chairs. The Theme Chairs give a short report (20 minutes each), which is followed by discussion for the rest of the session. The aim here is to identify and clarify the key points that have emerged from the conference, including areas of consensus or conflict, critical insights, and issues, challenges and directions for policy development.

Policy Panel
Delivering Skills for Creativity: Theme Closing
11:00am – 12:00pm, Ballroom 3

Chaired by Lee Corner, LAC Limited

Theme Closing Sessions mirror the Theme Introduction Sessions of the first day. The format is a Policy Panel led and guided by the Theme Champion and the two Theme Chairs. The Theme Chairs give a short report (20 minutes each), which is followed by discussion for the rest of the session. The aim here is to identify and clarify the key points that have emerged from the conference, including areas of consensus or conflict, critical insights, and issues, challenges and directions for policy development.

Policy Panel
Closing Plenary
1:30pm – 3:00pm, Ballroom

Chaired by Simon Evans, Creative Clusters

Plenary

James Purnell, Minister for the Creative Industries & Tourism, De
pt for Culture, Media & Sport, UK


CreativeWorld: Visions of the UK Creative Economy in 2015
Howard Beale, Partner, thefishcansing, UK


Day 3: Special Events (Wed 26 Oct)
W5 Visit (Weds 26th): whowhatwherewhenwhy
3:30pm – 5:00pm, W5

W5 is an ‘interactive discovery centre’ devoted to experiential learning, whose thought-provoking exhibits provide visitors of all ages with hands-on experiences of science, engineering and technology whilst also making links with art and design. Dr. Sally Montgomery, Director of W5, will personally host this visit, describing W5’s educational work, their partnership with NESTA and introducing a host of brand new exhibits that have been specially designed for W5.

Tour
Belfast City: Historical Pub Tour
7:00pm – 11:00pm

No visit to Belfast would be complete without a trip around it’s famous pubs!

This tour will enable you to un-wind after the busy conference schedule and sample the hospitality and culture of Belfast city, whilst enjoying the ‘craic’ with the locals in some of Belfast’s finest and most historic pubs.

The tour will include The Crown Liquor Saloon (pictured right), Kely’s Cellars, McHugh’s Bar and Whites Tavern.

Day 4: Special Events (Thu 27 Oct)
Laganside – Regeneration in Belfast: Walking Tour
10:00am – 12:00pm

The Laganside Corporation works to promote the social and economic regeneration of inner city areas around the River Lagan and the historic Cathedral Quarter. Today, as a result, the River Lagan is now viewed as a major asset, an exciting place to work, live and play.

Laganside will host a presentation and tour of the Cathedral Quarter and beyond, illustrating the impact their work has had on this new ‘Cultural Quarter’ in Belfast.

Tour